Posts Tagged ‘cabbage’

Mulberries, celery both popular

Yesterday morning’s trip to the Farmers’ Market was another success, with people very interested in the mulberries and celery that I brought. The broccoli, radishes and cabbage sold well, too, but they weren’t the center of attention.

A lot of people were surprised to see celery there, which, according to most customers, isn’t supposed to grow well here in Nebraska. I can’t say I had any problems getting it to flourish, though. It probably helps that I’ve had it under a controlled drip irrigation system, and that the cool, wet weather we’ve had the last month was what it likes.

The mulberries were kind of a whim on my part. On Friday night, I was snacking on a few plump berries from the mulberry tree next to the garden when I realized that there might be some folks out there who’d like to have some fresh berries from the market. I spread out a sheet, shook the tree, gathered the ripe fruit, rinsed it and brought it to market. I sold eight of the nine tubs I gathered, and everyone seemed pleased when they popped open the tub for a snack of the sweet fruit.

I’ll have more mulberries (and celery) next Saturday, June 27th, at the market, then I’m taking off the 4th of July before returning to the Old Market on Saturday, July 11th.

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What’s ready this week

broccoli
After a quick check of the garden, it looks like we’ll have many of the same vegetables ready this week as last, with a couple additions.

The last of the broccoli (pictured above) is heading out on the primary stalks, and there should be a pretty decent number of firm heads this week.

This will be the last week for the radishes, as well. They’re all about golf ball size, and still crisp and delicious.

Although we had four heads of cabbage ready last week, this will be the week for them to take off. It looks like at least a dozen heads will be ready for Saturday.

After some slow growth in the first month, it looks like the celery stalks are ripe for the picking this week. No one at the market had celery last week, so it looks like I might have the only source of it at the market this time around.

There will be a few more kohlrabi, but for the most part, we’re done with them until the second crop (which is doing well) comes in after about three to four more weeks.

The peas are getting close, but probably won’t be ready for another two weeks. Lots and lots of pods and flowers on the vines, though.

And, as a surprise, I might just have some fresh berries to sell this week. Let’s just say that the mulberry tree by the garden is looking pretty good — and I’ve tasted the berries once or twice to check.

That went well

kohlrabi
My initial trip down to the Farmers’ Market in 2009 went pretty darn well. I made some new friends with the vendors near me, had a nice time talking with customers, enjoyed the good weather — and most importantly, actually sold most of my produce.

Out of the 40 or so kohlrabi (pictured above) I brought down there, I only returned home with three. I sold three of the four heads of cabbage, and all but one head of broccoli. The plethora of radishes I brought sold well, with about two-thirds of them bought.

Also, I seemed to be the unofficial ambassador for kohlrabi. A lot of people walked up, interested in knowing what this odd vegetable was. Most people who were aware of kohlrabi, and had tasted it before, seemed to recall it as something their grandmother served. I never considered the kohlrabi an old-fashioned vegetable, but maybe it is…

I’m looking forward to seeing where my booth will be next week. I enjoyed talking with the fine folks from Herb’s Handywork and The Grass Menagerie on Saturday, and I hope my new vendor neighbors will be just as interesting.

Picked…

cabbage
In preparation for my appearance at the Omaha Farmers’ Market tomorrow, I went out and picked some produce today.

And it was wet. And rainy. And muddy.

But I persevered, and filled several boxes with fresh, tasty-looking vegetables.

I have about three dozen kohlrabi, a little on the big side but nonethless very tender and tasty. I cut open one to check, and it was crisp, sweet and delicious.

I also pulled a couple hundred radishes. They’re all about golf ball size or slightly smaller, and have no insect damage at all. I was pleasantly surprised at that. I have two different cultivars, and both look great.

Although I’m a bit disappointed in the effort my broccoli is giving to producing big heads, I got about a dozen good heads out of the garden today. It looks like next week will be better, though.

And for good measure, I cut the four biggest heads of cabbage. They’re nice and dense, and the leaves are extra-crisp. Nice.

Come on out and see me at the Farmers’ Market on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and be sure to check back for updates throughout the week!

What’s ready now: Cool-season crops

pea flower
I’ll admit it — my vegetables are a little behind where they should be. Hey, when you’re a full-time student, it can be hard to get everything in on time.

But we’ve got a few things that are at their peak right now…

The radishes are perfect this week. Just the right size, and the few I’ve pulled and tasted have been crisp, peppery and delicious.

The kohlrabi is more than ready, and is right on the edge of getting too big. We’ll be selling everything we have this week.

The broccoli¬† has been a disappointment, with the heads going to flower well before they reach a saleable size. Perhaps half a dozen will get the nice 6″ across heads, but the rest will probably end up on my plate.

Cabbage heads are really beginning to swell up to a nice size, looking like leafy softballs in neat rows. They’ll be ready this week and the next.

My brussels sprouts are lagging, but that’s ok. I’m a little weirded out by them, anyway.

The peas (pictured above) look great, and the flowers are just taking over the tendrils in the past week. They’ll be forming pods soon.

All of my 120+ tomato plants have little yellow flowers popping out, and I’ll probably need to get cages on the rest of them soon. They’re growing like crazy.

Carrots, turnips, okra, bush beans and cowpeas are all taking off, too.

All of my vine crops (watermelon, gourds, squash, zucchini, pumpkins, cucumbers) are starting to explore and test their limits as well.

And, perhaps most exciting, is the fact that the raspberries I planted are thriving. They really, really like the moist, partially shaded understory environment under the American elms. There won’t be a crop this year, but next year… look out!